Open House: The Spaces Where We Learn

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This post is the second in three Open House posts about the start of our 2015-16 school year. You can find links to all of the Open House posts here where I've share our curricula and a peek at a school day as well as this post about the spaces where we learn. You can also link up any of your open house posts. Share your curriculum, your schoolroom, a peek into your schedule by linking up below.

If you've come to see our learning spaces expecting an immaculately arranged room with perfectly organized materials, I'm afraid you won't find that. We live in a small space. So our schoolroom is also our dining room, part pantry, and sometime playroom. I use baskets, plastic bins, shelves- anything that will organize our materials and make sense of the clutter. Don't expect anything fancy. But come on in and have a look.

A look at our homeschool schoolroom and the areas where we do school

The area that we use as our main schoolroom is meant to be a formal dining room. We do eat there, but we also use this area primarily for school. And, yes, there is lots and lots of stuff. It's everywhere.

Behind me as I take this picture, I have pantry shelves and a second refrigerator. I have no pantry in my kitchen, so we made one in this space, using wire storage shelves.


The wall space in the schoolroom/dining room/pantry/playroom is covered with school related posters and children's art work.


We have one main desktop computer. The older kids each have their own laptop, but the younger two use this one for school. Their math is computer based, so they take turns using the desktop and my laptop.


This table was a gift to us from Jason's parents some Christmas ago. It's been an absolutely wonderful thing as I've used it for school for many years now. The younger girls use it as a split desk currently. They've divided down the middle, and they each have some table top as well as a plastic bin underneath to store the current books they're using.


I've bragged on my book shelves before, but I can't but mention them. These were office shelves that were no longer needed and were being tossed. I grabbed them up and made room for them. They are in the foyer of our front door, the area that leads into the schoolroom. They block off quite a bit of space and really prevent us from using the front door. But it's worth it for these amazing shelves.


The older kids work independently, so they each have a desk and school set up in their rooms.

Charles is actually my more organized child who likes to keep things all a certain way.


Kathryne's desk is in the underneath of the girls' bedroom loft. Her space is always a little more "girly" and a good bit less organized.



So there you have it- a look at the spaces where we learn. Of course, like most homeschool families, our learning is never really confined to a desk or a space we consider a schoolroom. We also learn in the kitchen while making cookies, in the car listening to an audio book, on the couch as we're snuggled up reading, or outside sitting on the swing and listening to a read aloud. We have certain places we've set up as "school areas", but true learning is happening all the time wherever we are.


Now I'd love for you to link up your Open House posts. Share your curriculum or give us a peek into your schoolroom or your day. (It's okay to link up more than one post.)






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2 comments :

  1. On Monday-Wednesday we had school in the Quilting Den (my sewing room/computer/storage/school stuff on walls). On Thursday we had school at the Dining room table and the Nursery (girls bedroom). Today we had school in the floor of the nursery and I'm wondering how it's Friday...

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    1. Oh yes. We like to move around- especially for reading. It happens where we're most comfortable. :-)

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