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Why Use Allegories to Teach Children Spiritual Truths...And a Look at the Adam Raccoon Picture Book Allegories

When my oldest children were very young- quite some year ago now, it seems, my mother gave them two books after a trip. The books were Adam Raccoon: Lost Woods and Adam Raccoon: Circus Master. 

The books were allegories, designed to teach kids spiritual truths. My kids loved them. We read them over and over and over. When my younger girls came along, they found and fell in love with these books as well. They've been well read over the years.

Recently I had the opportunity to learn more about the Adam Raccoon books and to review them as part of a re-release. I was so excited because these books are such great resources for teaching even young children spiritual truths. I also have the fun of offering a giveaway of four Adam Raccoon books after the post. You can enter to win your choice of four of the Adam Raccoon titles below.

Using allegory to teach kids spiritual truths


Why Use Allegories to Teach Children Spiritual Truths


A well-written story draws and holds kids' attention.


When you read a well-written story, you just can't help being drawn in to the story. You want to keep reading. The story captures you. 

This is one reason that allegories can be such powerful tools. When they are well-written, they draw kids in and hold their attention. Jesus knew this when he lived on earth and ministered to His followers. He used parables that captured the attention of His listeners and drew them in.

The Adam Raccoon books are very well-written. Kids are drawn into the stories, and they want to read more. Adam's adventures are interesting. The pictures in the books are colorful and captivating. Kids will want to read these books.

Kids can relate to the characters and situations in an allegory.


The Bible was written in a time period that is foreign to children. The culture, the references- they're often strange to children and kids just can't relate. 

In an allegory with more modern-day people and places and situations, kids can relate. And when they can relate, they'll be better able to understand the story and the references.

When Adam Raccoon decides to take a shortcut in the race in the story Race to Victory Mountain, kids can relate. They've wanted to win before, to come out on top. So they understand Adam's dilemma and his choice.

Allegories make deep spiritual truths more understandable.


Sometimes even we as adults struggle with Scripture. We don't understand. It isn't clear. We're not sure exactly what is meant. Children struggle even more. An allegory can take the truths of Scripture and make them more understandable, easier for kids to comprehend and process.

The idea that we are ambassadors for Christ and what that really means is a deep one that kids may not understand. But when Adam Raccoon struggles with talking to a giant after he is given a special badge and the job of telling people about King Aren in the story The Mighty Giant, kids can get that. It's a situation that they can understand.

Using allegory to teach kids spiritual truths


More About the Adam Raccoon Series


The Adam Raccoon Books are the creation of Glen Keane, a former Disney animator. The books feature Adam Raccoon. He and his forest friends live in Master's Wood, a place governed by King Aren, a mighty but benevolent lion.

There are eight books in the Adam Raccoon series.
  • Forever Falls: Adam wants to swim in the forbidden Forever Falls. When the temptation becomes too great, Adam is trouble until King Aren comes to his rescue.
  • Lost Woods: Adam wants to follow King Aren through Master's Wood but doesn't want to let go of his possessions. When he's finally lost everything but one ball, he becomes separated from the king in Lost Woods as he attempts to keep up with his ball. 
  • The Circus Master: The circus seems like an awesome, fun thing to Adam. When he has the chance to leave King Aren and Master's Wood and join up, he takes it. Unfortunately things are not as they seem, and Adam's life in the circus is soon a sad one. All he wants is to go back to King Aren and beg the king to let him return.
  • The Flying Machine: King Aren knows that Adam really wants to fly. He gives Adam a flying machine that needs to be built. He leaves Adam, advising him to carefully read the instructions and listen to a wise old turtle to be able to build it correctly. But when Professor comes along, tossing out the instructions and advising Adam to build the machine in whatever way feels right to him, trouble is coming.
  • The Mighty Giant: It's Adam's job to spread word of King Aren throughout Master's Wood. But when a huge giant comes into the wood, Adam doesn't want to be the one to approach him.
  • The King's Big Dinner: King Aren sends Adam out to invite everyone he sees to a huge dinner. Adam skips some people he thinks aren't a good fit- like a skunk, and a nest full of baby birds. But the folks he invites aren't really interested in the dinner. Adam learns that the people he thought weren't worthy are exactly the right guests.
  • Race to Victory Mountain: Adam wants to win the race to Victory Mountain. Anyone who completes the race will win- it's not about how fast you are, but he's determined to be the fastest. King Aren warns him to stay on the course. But when Adam gets behind because he's been distracted by other things, he decides to try a shortcut.
  • Bully Garumph: Adam is tired of being bullied by Garumph the Bear. But he's surprised by King Aren's advice when it comes to dealing with the bully.





Adam Raccoon Book Giveaway


And now...you can enter to win your choice of four titles from the Adam Raccoon series. One winner will choose four of the books mentioned above. Enter the giveaway below.

Adam Raccoon book giveaway


Adam Raccoon Series- 4 Books

1 comment:

  1. I haven't heard of these before but they look great. Such a fab way to introduce the concept to children! :)

    ReplyDelete

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