Why Teach World History from a Christian Perspective...And a Review of Modernity from Compass Classroom

Although I'm a Christian homeschooling mom, all of the curricula I chose isn't necessarily from a Christian worldview. I've used writing curricula and math curricula from secular publishers. And I've used secular curricula for electives. But for some subjects, I'm particular about choosing curricula that is from a Christian worldview.

History is one of those subjects. When it comes to history, I want to teach the kids to look at the past from a Christian worldview.

World history from a Christian perspective and a review of Modernity


Recently I had the opportunity to review Modernity, a  video-based modern world history curriculum from Compass Classroom. This is an excellent high school history curriculum that comes from a Christian worldview. Modernity can be a great choice for homeschoolers who want a history curriculum from a Christian perspective.

So, why teach world history from a Christian perspective?


We learn history to see God's work in mankind throughout time.


As we look at the past through a Christian lens, we can see God's hand. When kids are taught history from a Christian perspective, they'll see the development of civilizations, the rise of empires, wars between world powers, and all of the events of history as a part of God's big plan.

History from a Christian perspective gives students a lens through which to analyze events that have happened.


I have to admit that there are times when the politics and the machinations of the people in power are just confusing. It's hard to understand why some things happen in history. But when we teach kids to view history from a Christian perspective, they can have a better grasp of why people act in certain ways and they can see how God can use the events in history for His glory. They also learn to think critically and evaluate the events of history from a Christian worldview.

World history from a Christian perspective and a review of Modernity

Modernity from Compass Classroom


What is Modernity?


Modernity is a high school level world history curriculum that consists of video lectures taught by Dave Raymond. The material in the course covers world history from 1500 to the present day.

How does the class work?


The class is broken down into twenty seven weeks of lessons. For each week, there are five lectures. They could be watched one per day or you could combine and have students watch multiple lectures in one day. The lectures are all around 25-30 minutes long. Each weekly unit has an exam at the end.

In addition to the lectures, you'll have access to a student book and a teacher's guide. These come in a variety of forms, so you can access them on your computer as PDF files or read them on a variety of ereaders. The teacher's guide contains information about how to use the course, the projects and assignments the students will be completing, a checklist to keep track of progress through the course, and answers for the exam questions.

The student book contains reading selections and questions for students. In addition to these, students are to complete a portfolio that demonstrates in a visual and written way what's been learned, two projects, a speech, and a research paper. Students are also expected to take notes of the lectures, and Dave Raymond talks about how to do this in the first section of the course.

My Thoughts...


As a history buff myself, I love Modernity. I love the information. History is exciting to me. And modern history is especially interesting.

As a parent, I like the ease and convenience of a video-based class where kids are listening to a lecture from a teacher with the passion for and knowledge of the subject and where I'm presented with a guide to help me understand exactly what's required of them so that I can follow up and walk through the course with them.

Would my children like or use it? Hmmm. My oldest- who just graduated from high school- would have loved this history course. She does well with a lecture format and with note-taking, and she would have enjoyed creating a portfolio and completing the assignments. She's college-bound, so the style would have been a great preparation for her as she heads into college classes that will likely have a similar format and requirements.

However, my second-born would not do well with Modernity. He's not headed to a liberal arts college, and he doesn't learn well from sitting and listening to a lecture. He would find the portfolio creation to be tedious. He does better with a straightforward, read the book and answer the questions, curriculum.

Should you use Modernity? If you have a college-bound student and you're looking for a great, comprehensive modern history course that will help your child process history through the lens of a Christian perspective, then YES. This is the course for you.

If you have a more active student who isn't headed for college and who finds lectures difficult to follow and note-taking a challenge, it may not be a good fit.

I'm sad that my firstborn missed it. But I do think it's going to be a good fit for at least one of my younger girls, so I'm holding out hope.

You can learn more about the course at Compass Classroom here.

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